Bark bark, all the way to the park

This is my doggy-themed calendar’s July message: “Dogs feel very strongly that they should always go with you in the car, in case the need should arise for them to bark violently in your ear” (by Dave Barry). Quirky pic, funny quote. Until it’s happening to you.

While barking is a natural behavior for dogs and for most a way to express their excitement when going out to somewhere exciting or one of the places they love best (or frustration that they’re not there yet!), it’s not just annoying but also painful and dangerous to have a baying, howling, yapping, barking or squealing dog in your ear.

Most dogs are reportedly able to bark at 100 Decibels, with most countries’ national recommended safety standards for preventing hearing loss being limiting exposure to noises over 85 Decibels. Driving with continuous barking from a furry passenger in an enclosed space is certainly not recommended.

Incidentally, an Aussie dog holds the Guinness World Record for the loudest bark. Charlie, a Golden Retriever, earned the title in 2013 by registering an incredible 113.1 decibels, with his woof apparently producing the same noise output as a loud rock concert. It was reported by his owners that he thankfully only barks on command.

Pedadoggy’s top tips for stopping dogs barking in the car:*

  • Desensitise the entire car trip experience and condition (rewire) the dog for calm. If the excitement or fear starts when you pick up the car keys, pick them up a few times a day for a few days without going anywhere and reward the dog for other calm behavior such as sitting. Same goes for the leash or whatever is the signal that it’s park time. Eventually build up to getting in the car and not going anywhere, rewarding for calm. Then progressing to travelling even just a few metres. This will also be a lot easier if you offer the dog a chew or yummily stuffed Kong while they are in the car to distract them.
  • If you can teach your dog to bark on command then you can teach them to shush or be quiet on command too. Once the dog has mastered this ‘trick’, you can progress to practicing it in the car without going anywhere, then graduating to when you are traveling, with the help of a human training partner in the back seat.

Remember before heading off to secure the dog in the car with either a harness clipped into an anchor point, or by putting the dog in a crate. In NSW, road safety legislation stipulates that motorists must not drive a vehicle with an animal on their lap or preventing them from having proper control of the car – a penalty of three demerit points and a fine of $338, rising to $422 if caught in a school zone. Also, if an animal is injured as a result of being unrestrained, owners also face up to six months’ jail and fines of up to $5500 under the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act.

Do you have a car barker? What has helped you ?

* Ones that don’t use citronella or shock collars, shouting at the dog or any other punishing training techniques or tools.

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